Market Perspective

Conservation Easements – Not A Positive Force in Virginia – Week 4

Posted by on Jun 13, 2019 in Ned Massie, Perspective | 0 comments

As a true believer in free market capitalism being the best way to allocate resources, I would like to provide you a very brief summary of some of the most serious negatives associated with Conservation Easement Tax Credits. Here is the third of the six worse negatives: A Conservation Easement Does Not Reduce the Cost of Government: In fact, taxes have to be increased because the money spent on Conservation Easement Tax Credits is money that is not spent on the other needs of our modern Virginia society – public roads, upgraded utility systems, schools, statewide fiber optic cable, etc.  So while the cost of government does not go down, the tax revenue does decrease and therefore, taxes increase. We saw that impact under both Governor Warner and Governor...

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Conservation Easements – Not a Positive Force in Virginia – Week 3

Posted by on Jun 6, 2019 in Ned Massie, Perspective | 0 comments

As a true believer in free market capitalism being the best way to allocate resources, I would like to provide you a very brief summary of some of the most serious negatives associated with Conservation Easement Tax Credits. Here is the second of the six worse negatives: An Unfair Tax Burden on Average Virginians: While the average Virginian struggles to pay their taxes, why are we allowing the wealthy to pay less than their share just because they buy Conservation Easement Tax Credits? It seems the vote creating Conservation Easement Tax Credits was out of sympathy for the...

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Conservation Easements – Not A Positive Force in Virginia – Week 2

Posted by on May 29, 2019 in Ned Massie, Perspective | 0 comments

As a true believer in free market capitalism being the best way to allocate resources, I would like to provide you a very brief summary of some of the most serious negatives associated with Conservation Easement Tax Credits. Here is the first of the six worse negatives: Conservation Easements are “in perpetuity”: The significance of “in perpetuity” is best illustrated by the fact that if Captain John Smith had claimed the new land of Virginia (when he put his foot on the ground in Jamestown in 1607) for the Queen of England and then immediately placed a conservation easement on the new land, there would not be one home, road, utility system, etc. built in Virginia in the last 412 years. Just like Captain John Smith, none of us today can see what use of land will be necessary for Virginian’s to prosper in 50 years, 100 years, much less 400 years in the future. “In perpetuity” is a dangerously long...

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Conservation Easements – Not a Positive Force in Virginia – Week 1

Posted by on May 15, 2019 in Ned Massie, Perspective | 0 comments

Introduction: Under Governor Mark Warner, Virginia created the opportunity for land owners to place conservation easements on their land in return for receiving Tax Credits. Tax Credits are a vehicle that benefits wealthy individuals who can buy Tax Credits at a discount and then use the Credits to pay the taxes that they owe. The net effect is that the wealthy get to pay their taxes for about $0.75 or $0.80 on the dollar. Like many government programs that sound great to politicians, the details are called “unintended consequences”. Conservation Easement Tax Credits are certainly in that category. It is also obvious Governor Warner was not thinking of the “average Virginian” when he championed this idea that so benefits the wealthy. An industry has been created to create and transfer Conservation Easement Tax Credits. When the legislature is in session, that industry always publishes a variety of articles talking about the many positives of the Tax Credit program. Never have I seen a rational discussion about Conservation Easement Tax Credits that also covered the enormous downside of this seriously flawed program. As a true believer in free market capitalism being the best way to allocate resources, over the next six weeks I would like to provide you a very brief summary of some of the most serious negatives associated with Conservation Easement Tax Credits. Stay...

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Six Important Trends to Watch – Week 6

Posted by on May 14, 2019 in Ned Massie, Perspective | 0 comments

The European Economy: Data coming out of Europe continues to reflect concern to anyone watching European economics or Global economics. It appears that many of the Euro countries’ economies have weakened significantly, including that of Germany, which has been the economic engine of Europe. Brexit and the never-ending debate about how to exit is creating tremendous uncertainty for businesses. There will be unintended consequences from Brexit but the never-ending debate and inability to come up with a plan resulting in constant delays of a hard exit is probably worse than just leaving. Because of the uncertainty, businesses are hesitant to make investments; consumers will diminish their purchases; and the result is a slowing economy. Combined with the turmoil in China, the turmoil in Europe will have a negative impact on the global economy. The United States, because of the 2017 Tax Act, will continue to have a strong economy but it will not be as strong as if the global economy was also humming along. It is critical to remember that land is the source of all wealth. Every product that we humans consume originates with land. Not all tracts of land are equal in quality and portfolio management requires every investor to hold some cash for liquidity. But historically, long term the best investment is...

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Six Important Trends to Watch – Week 5

Posted by on May 9, 2019 in Ned Massie, Perspective | 0 comments

The Chinese Financial System: The phrase “Unsustainable actions continue until they don’t” is absolutely appropriate relative to the Chinese financial system. Analyses being published about China’s banking system and financial markets continue to highlight the irregularities that suggest that their banking system once again needs to be bailed out. Th size of the current potential bailout being discussed is similar in size to the TARP that was passed by Congress in September of 2008 as our financial markets were collapsing. Although China’s banks do not appear to be in as bad of shape as our American banks were in 2008, they have very significant challenges and some may not be viable. Some of the facts that recently came out include the following: The state-controlled industrial firms that are the biggest borrowers of the biggest banks in China are earning a 4% return on their assets while the average bank lending rate is 5.6%. That is unsustainable. The amount of bad debt being held by the banks far exceeds the loan loss reserves of China’s banks; The small Chinese banks are the primary lenders to the small, private businesses in China. Yet the small banks are the ones that are having the greatest difficulty in being profitable. The Chinese Vice Premier recently instructed the large banks that they needed to increase their loans to small businesses by 30%. That is sort of like pushing on a wet noodle. Chinese banks will probably need hundreds of billions of dollars in new capital by the 2020’s. Clearly, if it wasn’t for the fact that the Chinese government owns the majority of the big banks, that banking system would have already collapsed. Eventually global currency traders will start factoring in the instability of the Chinese banking system. When that happens, the Chinese currency will become unstable and the resulting economic ripple effects will quickly move around the globe. It is critical to remember that land is the source of all wealth. Every product that we humans consume originates with land. Not all tracts of land are equal in quality and portfolio management requires every investor to hold some cash for liquidity. But historically, long term the best investment is...

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